Can you repeat tat? Preparation Post: In-Person Interview

Just a typical day! Courtesy Google Images

Just a typical day! Courtesy Google Images

Friday, third period, is typically a time when thoughts are flying across the room. “What standard do we need to cover? How long do we think that will take? What resources can we find for this?”

My grade level partner Krista and I meet during our prep period to collaboratively plan our eighth grade lessons for the following week. This week, however, we are ahead of the game and have already mapped out our game plan for tackling, and rocking, our test prep unit (gotta love the New Jersey ASK).

So, Krista has agreed to allow me to interview her about my topic of tattoos. Just like a typical planning period, tomorrow during third period, we are going to meet in one of our classrooms where we will share ideas and partake in a relaxing conversation, except this time, it will have nothing to do with the Common Core.

Krista has double sleeves that she sports every day. Yes, even in January. She has been a teacher for eighteen years and continues to commit herself everyday in the classroom so that student achievement occurs. And it does. Every time I walk by her room, her students are diligently working, many times with their heads bent over their work, furiously writing. I admire her as a teacher and have always appreciated the help she has given me, as I am “only” in my third year of teaching. (When I was a first year teacher, looking ahead to having three years of teaching experience seemed like the Garden of Eden.)

As an educator, I am interviewing Krista to gain her insight on tattoos in education. Since she has been in a district for quite some time where teachers are allowed to expose tattoos, I am anticipating a great deal of information in this area and look forward to hearing what her experience has been like. While there are other teachers in the district with tattoos, I am interviewing Krista in particular since her tattoos are exceedingly noticeable.

In regard to Postmodern Interviewing, I will be approaching this interview with the reflexive dyadic interview method in mind. One of the initial findings that drew me to this approach was the fact that the “interviewer typically shares personal experience” (162). Treating this interview like a conversation, I plan on articulating and sharing just as much with Krista as she shares with me. I also plan to focus on the “communicative process of the interview” (162). Even though Krista and I have shared many conversations thus far, I have never gone back to my room to analyze the process by which we spoke. This focused evaluating will be a new experience for me and one to which I am looking forward since it will be quite different from other conversation experiences.

Thus, “the final product includes the cognitive and emotional reflections of the researcher” (162). After the interview, I anticipate that I will scrutinize the thoughts and ideas shared as well as the emotional implications divulged during the interview process. This is an essential component of reflexive dyadic interviewing because it requires me to think of the topic both in terms of how the information was told, but also in terms of how I internalized it. Several readings suggest that information that the researcher chooses to include in various writings reveals a larger picture of the interviewer herself, so during the reflection process, I will discover more about myself as a person based on how I see the information and what I choose to include.

The main topics that I wish to cover in the interview include:

  • Krista’s experience in the field of education bearing double sleeves
  • Reactions from parents and students when they notice her tattoos
  • What type of circumstances arise where she feels like she needs to cover her tattoos (both professionally and personally)
  • If she ever feels the need to defend her tattoos and how she goes about doing so
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